Oct 8, 2017

My School is Going 1:1 Where Do I Start?

My School is Going 1:1 Where Do I Start?

My School Just Announced We Will Be 1:1 Where Do I Begin?!

School Expectations

First of all, don't panic! Spend some time finding out what the school expectations and rules about 1:1 devices are, how was the devices will be assigned, where will they be stored and what training is provided. Also think about how often will you be expected to use them, or how often you want to use them? What school policies may be in place around students carrying them between classes, or bringing them home? What is the devices aren’t charged? What will the behavior policies be for students who are on other websites? Some of these questions may not have quick and easy answers but they are important to start thinking about, as you begin framing how you want to use technology in your classroom.

Technology is a Tool

Don’t get overwhelmed, but realize that the technology is a tool just like any other tool. It is there to help you and your students. Using technology could completely transform the way that you teach but there are lots of small steps for you to start with as well. Using technology in your classroom doesn't have to be an overnight dramatic shift.

Procedures and Skills

As you get started make sure you allow some time to teach procedures and teach technology skills. Even though we think students grew up with technology, and that they know a lot about technology, it often turns out that they don't know how to use technology for academic purposes. They may know how to use it for YouTube or other ways, or know how to do things on their phones, but may not know how to do some of the tasks that we ask them.

Some procedures and introductory lessons that you may want to cover in your classroom if they are not taught in school as a whole include: digital citizenship, procedures for carrying a Chromebook or laptop, where they will be stored, charging procedures, what to do if a student's technology is not working or is missing that day. What classroom rituals and routines do you want to set up around the devices. Some teachers have students put in only one earbud, close the lid of the laptop or chromebook, or put tablets face down when the teacher is speaking, etc. What will be the consequences if a student doesn't follow the technology directions? If you take the device away do you have an alternative assignment? If it WiFi is down or technology is unavailable do you have an alternate emergency assignment? These are things to think about and to try to clarify in your head as you begin to picture your classroom with technology. These are not meant to scare you off but to prevent future problems.

How Do you Want to Use Technology 

Once you have some of those procedural things out of the way, start thinking about how and when you want to start to build in technology into your classroom. Do you want to use them at the start of class everyday? At the end of class everyday? (There are a lot of great ways to do formative assessment or warm ups using Google Forms). Do you plan to use them only as needed for certain interactive activities or stations? Especially for science, there are a lot of good videos (BrainPop, CrashCourse, Bozeman Science, Amoeba Sisters) and interactive virtual labs and field trips to use for particular topics).  You could also look into Digital Interactive Notebooks, but probably not as a first step. 

Using technology in the classroom really provides a lot of opportunities to engage students, to individualize instruction, to free up your time to work with students rather than being at the front of the room and for students to connect with others outside of the classroom walls.

My advice would be to jump in and get started. Emphasize to the students that you are learning along with them, and take it one step at a time.

Inspirational Ideas and Resources

Just for inspiration, here are a few of my favorite resources for technology in education happening very differently through technology!

Jump In and Give It a Try! 

Don’t get overwhelmed by learning the tech tool. You can do that with a bit of training or some searching of online tutorials/videos. Instead, spend your time thinking about how you want your technology-infused classroom to look. What will it look like in the long-run? What smaller steps can you take now to go toward that goal? Maybe each marking period you can add on to that? Or maybe take one unit and re-vamp it, but leave your others for now.

What are your 1:1 technology questions and concerns? Leave your questions below or in our Facebook group, but don’t be afraid. Give it a try!

Sep 27, 2017

4 Technology-Rich Ways For Students to Demonstrate Knowledge

4 Ways to Students to Demonstrate Knowledge with Technology

4 Technology-Rich Ways for Students to Demonstrate Their Knowledge

Many times we asked students to do class work in such a traditional manner, such as to write a research paper, write an essay to present their knowledge, in written form only. While it is important that students can read and write, This is not the only way for them to show their knowledge. It's important to give an element of choice as well as to give variety throughout the year so that students who excel in other areas, or who struggle with writing have a chance to show their knowledge.

Why not just write an essay? 

Perhaps that particular student is not a strong writer, but really does know the content. Or may they are really good at animation, graphic design, sound effects, or some other aspect. It's time that their knowledge show through. Some great ways for them to demonstrate their knowledge, other than written expression would be a screencast, Thinglink, a PowerPoint or Google Slide presentation, a podcast, or even an animation such as PowToon. Sometimes, even if the student is a stronger writer, having an aspect of choice is so important. Allowing the student more choice over how to demonstrate their knowledge is a way to get more buy-in and engagement from him or her, and more excitement about the assignment.

Podcast

A podcast is a very easy alternative to implement, and has many different applications in the classroom. Students could simply do a voice recording on a tablet, phone, computer with a microphone, or many other devices. If you actually want it to be posted as a podcast available online, this is possible too, and there are a lot of tutorials and guides online. However, for a single assignment, it would be appropriate for students to just make a recording, and it could even be shared as an audio file on Google Drive, if you choose. The downside of this is it of course you can't include any visual elements but for some students and some topics this will be enough.

Screencast

A screencast is a recording of the computer screen it can be done with a camera with it, showing the student's face, or without and can record only the tab or the desktop of the computer, along with recording audio. This is a very simple way to record a short presentation with narration, a technology skill, or student presenting or showing a particular topic or skill. There are lots of ways to do a screen test but my personal favorite is the Chrome extension screencastify I believe you can make a free recording up to 10 minutes and the results is saved right in Google Drive. Very simple!!

Thinglink

Thinglink is a paid product, but there are also free accounts with a few limitations. Thinglink allows the student to start with a picture such as a map, photograph, diagram, etc and then add certain buttons with information and links, videos, sound files, or even text documents and callout buttons to make a multi-media clickable image. Again, this depends on the topic, and how it is best suited. I think this would be great for presentations where you want to show a lot of information from different sources. A word of caution, be careful that the student is able to summarize their information, or paraphrase and cite the information, because it can be very easy to just cut and paste a lot of information. Thinglink is a great way to make a really different kind of presentation and include various kinds of information. Here is a great example of a human body presentation.

Powtoon

Powtoon will allow students to create an animation. They write the script, and record the audio, and then choose different backgrounds, characters, and what they will say. Here is an elementary example


Example Human Body Thinglink

Powtoon can be a lot of fun and very interactive for the students. It is quite different than what they may have done before. The warning on this one is that there will be a bit of a learning curve for students. It may take some time for them to get comfortable, so allow extra time to learn the technology if you choose this method.



Lastly, don’t rule out a PowerPoint or Google slide presentation. This is not really a brand new method, but can be an alternative to a written presentation. Both allow shorter, more broken up writing, and the insertion of videos, images, and other multimedia formats into the presentation. Google Slides is easier to insert videos and easier to share the final presentation. PowerPoint is easier to insert narration or sound files if this is something that you want students to do. Adding audio to Google Slides is difficult.

As we transition to using more technology, under the SAMR model, these may be some ways to push your teaching, and your students learning, to the next level, and to further engage your students. Have you used any of these in your classroom? What other alternatives do you utilize, besides a written essay, do you use for students to demonstrate knowledge? Please share in the comments.

4 Ways to Students to Demonstrate Knowledge with Technology

Sep 10, 2017

5 Free New Technologies to Try in Your Classroom Right Now


5 Free New Technologies to Try In Your Classroom Right Now

With all the technology available, it can be overwhelming. Here are 5 (and a bonus) new technology options that I suggest you try in your classroom this year, in bite-size pieces. They are easy ways to liven up some of your instruction and find new ways to engage with and connect with your students.

Screencasts in the Classroom

It can be intimidating to think of doing a video, but don’t be intimated. First of all, you don’t need to have your face on camera! This is key! You can do a screencast of your computer screen, of a file or PowerPoint, or a series of photographs or images, so you are really just doing a voice over.

There are several easy ways to do a screencast. If what you are doing is short, there is a Google Chrome extension called screencastify that will allow you to record camera, your desktop, a browser tab, audio only, or other combinations of that. It will save to YouTube and/or Google Drive, making the sharing of your video very easy.

If you are making a screencast based on images or slides, my favorite way to do it is in PowerPoint. It is pretty easy to “Insert Audio” and then have it play with the slides (you can set timing as well). Then export the whole thing as a movie when you are happy with it.

Why make a screencast? I have seen people screencast instructions or a mini-lesson for a sub, although I haven’t done that myself. I have used it to allow me to be in two places at once time. For example, I have used it to give directions at a station, while I’m free to circulate. I can show a lab demo, and kids who were absent can replay it. I can give instructions or introductory information, and, again, students who were absent can catch up easily. I have even used a video at one station, while I work with students at another stations.

Flipgrid

Flipgrid allows you to have short online video discussions with students. You post a prompt, and student can response via video. It's like FaceTime or Skype, with classroom applications! Here is a great write-up of some ways to use Flipgrid in class. Here is a really awesome example of a class using it to connect with a researcher in Antarctica

Plickers

We already have a lot of formative assessment tools available. What’s different about Plickers? Students don’t need devices! It's a technology tool because it uses technology to improve speeds, data collection and to make your life easier, but if you don’t have a lot of student tech, this is a great one to try.

To use Plickers you get free printable cards. They have a symbol on that that will not be recognizable to other students (so students won’t know what choice their peers are making). Also on the card, in small, lighter print, are choices (A, 1, B, etc). These cards can be assigned 1 per student, so you can collect data on each student’s individual answers.

When you ask a question, students hold up their card with the answer choice that they are selecting facing up. You take a picture, with the app on your phone, and your data is collected. Here is a video that shows in more detail.

Edpuzzle

If you want to use videos in your instruction, whether they are your own videos, or those from another source, consider EdPuzzle. You can make questions that go with a video, on a worksheet, or you can build in questions and quizzes into the video itself with EdPuzzle. This also gives you the option to enforce that students watch the entire video.

Lastly, there are many videos that already have questions. You can choose from these videos, and copy and modify the questions yourself. Here an example of an Amoeba Sisters Mitosis Video that I found (I did not make up the questions).



As a teacher, you can have your students sign up for a class, assign videos, and you will be able to see their progress in the video and all their quiz answers. You can also just give students a link to a video directly, if you don’t need as granular data.

Padlet

I have used Padlet only minimally myself, but it is one that I want to try more, and it is growing in popularity. It has a lot of potential uses, so I think it should be included on this list. Again, its very easy to use. It bills itself as “the easiest way to create and collaborate in the world.” The teacher (or someone) makes a prompt, on a ‘board’ and students can respond. Think of it as a big wall with sticky notes. However, those responses can also include links, images, etc, and you can build connections between the responses. Padlet is an extremely easy way to collect a lot of information quickly, and to have collaboration.

Bonus… Nearpod

I have not used Nearpod myself, so I’m not writing a lot about it, but I wanted to at least mention it here, in the bonus section. Nearpod allows you to add interactive elements into a PDF document, or into slides. In other words, it add more interaction into a 1:1 classroom. Here is a video showing it in action.



This is Nearpod: the 21st Century Classroom from Nearpod on Vimeo.

What's on your list of new classroom technologies to try?  Have you used any of these?  Tell use about it in the comments!
5 free new technologies to try in your classroom right now

Aug 27, 2017

What Quick and Easy Lunch Can I Bring?

Quick and Easy Lunch Tips for Teachers

What can you do to bring healthy lunches when you're rushing in the morning.  Maybe you're trying to get kids out the door as well and making lunch is the furthest thing from your mind, but you want to eat healthy.

tips and suggestions for quick and easy lunches for teachers

I very much believe in eating healthy and wanted to share a few tips and strategies to bring healthy lunches to school on a regular basis.  Skipping meals or not eating lunch is just not an option to me, so I have had to work out ways to get a decent lunch while having kids in my room, making copies, and trying to do all the other things teachers do in our 30 minute lunch (go to the bathroom??!)

What are some easy teacher lunches

Some of my favorites are the following

  • Salads in a jar
  • Left overs
  • Little things that I can snack on during the day, for example: crackers and cheese, yogurt, granola bars, pieces of fruit, veggies and dip, hard-boiled egg. 
  • Sandwiches is always a standby, or a wrap
  • Pre-packaged salads are okay but reading ingredients carefully
  • Soup (homemade or prepared)
  • Baked potato (I can microwave it at school if I get desperate, and bring some toppings). 


What are some tips to make this more successful?


These are not new but hopefully they will help:

  • Plan out your menu for the week. For me its it's often too hard or too confining to plan out each day.  I just try to make a list of at least 4 or 5 lunches (4 can be enough since sometimes there are leftovers, or something unexpected). 
  • Prep on the weekend!  Sometimes if I'm feeling ambitious I'll make a few mason jar salads or make a few of something else that I can take for lunch a couple days.   I have also made pasta salad and taken it for several days. 
  • Pack up leftovers after dinner right in lunch containers so I can just grab it in the morning maybe a piece of fruit 
  • Intentionally cook enough leftovers at dinner to be lunch the next day (doesn't always work because my kids have been eating as much lately, but worth a try!)
  • Cook ahead and freeze. This doesn't have to be a giant monthly cooking event, but make a pot of soup and freeze in lunch size portions. It helps SO much! 

For more information here some of my favorite resources for quick and easy lunches
tips and suggestions for quick and easy lunches for teachers

Aug 12, 2017

How to Balance Exercise with your busy teacher life

Tips to fit in exercise quickly and cheaply for a teacher or mom

I wanted to talk to you today about how to fit in exercise when you're a busy teacher.  I don't know about you but for me it's difficult. However I've been doing a lot of goal-setting and working on balance and priorities in my own life this year.  As a result, I really am trying to put my health as a priority, and I think that you should do the same.

It's really important that we all fit in some type of exercise.  It's important that that exercise be whatever you enjoy. If it's Zumba, aerobics, yoga, walking, running, biking, whatever -- just get moving!  How do you do that when you're balancing a full-time job? When you bringing work home? Maybe you have kids, or maybe you're a first year teacher and you're very overwhelmed.  I've been there! And recently I've been working hard on that and I wanted to share some of my suggestions with you.

First of all walking is a great way to fit it in.  I would recommend that as a place to start.  A lot of people have Fitbits.  If you don't want to spend the money or don't have a Fitbit there are free apps on your phone (such as Google Fit) that can track your steps.  I also have an older version of the Xiaomi Mi Band 2, Bluetooth 4.0 Xiaomi Mi Band 2 Wristband Bracelet With OLED Display Water-resistant Smart Heart Rate Fitness Tracker (much cheaper than the Fitbit  affiliate link - more in my price range).  By really shooting for that goal of around 10,000 steps a day can make a big difference in how you feel and how your day goes.  Maybe you get to work 15 minutes early and walk on the track.  Or you could go out during a free period and walk on the track or walk around the block.  All those types of things really do add up and make a difference in you hitting that goal number of steps.

What I've been doing is a combination of a few things.  My kids go to childcare in the morning to get on the bus so sometimes I'll take them just a little bit earlier, especially on the days when I don't teach first period.  I'll go work out and then go to school.  My husband's been going after school but by the time I get to the end of the day I don't want to go!!  So that doesn't work for me!

Another option is workout videos at home there are paid options like Beachbody on demand Les Mills or many others.  There are also free options.  If you are looking for a free place to start, here are a few great YouTube channels that are free:  Fitnessblender, BeFit, PopSugar Fitness, Yoga with Tara Stiles, Yoga with Adrienne, and Doyogawithme.

There are lots of ways that you can workout even in less than 30 minutes.  I play these videos on my tablet in a spot in the basement, but you can do whatever works for you.  You don't need a lot of equipment.  You can do a yoga with a mat and maybe blocks, so we are talking under $20. Some of the other videos you could get a small set of weights or a mat but again under $20.  You can get started now!  Don't put it off. Focus on small steps and you will see a big difference.  This is my workout space. I know its ugly! But its cool when I'm working out, quiet, and was very easy and cheap to put together. The important part is that I make it a habit to keep showing up!


I was having trouble at first because my kids were constantly in my hair and wanting to be underfoot and asking me questions while I was trying to work out so I ended up setting up an area in the basement. We have an unfinished basement but I got some floor mat tiles at Aldi's like this affliliate link (around $25.00).  I had a yoga mat already, and we have an extra chair that we were getting rid of.  I just bring the tablet down there (or you can even use your phone).  The kids can not come down to the basement for those 30 minutes and bother me.  If I really commit and take that 30 minutes a day it makes a huge difference in how I feel, how my day goes, and how much energy I have.  For me, sometimes its easier to workout at home than to go somewhere. While the kids are watching a show, or while dinner is cooking I can get in a quick workout.

There's a lot of research showing that exercise is one of the most effective treatments for people with chronic pain and/or depression.  Take advantage of it! It's free and has no side effects but huge benefits, so do your best to fit it in. Start from where you are try to increase a bit.  If you're not exercising at all and you aim for two or three times a week or if you are exercising and you want to bump it up a little bit more (intensity, frequency, etc).  Make your health a priority! It has made a big difference in my life this year.

Tips to fit in exercise quickly and cheaply for a teacher or mom~

Aug 7, 2017

Giant Secondary Science Giveaway

Welcome!  Thanks for stopping by our Huge Secondary Science Giveaway

The secondary science teachers of TpT want to make your school year a bit easier.  We are giving away 5 $100 TpT gift certificates, as well as individual prizes.  We want to get your school year off to a smoother start.  


You can win in two different ways: 

1. Many of the sellers pictures are giving away individual resource prizes on their own blogs!  Check out the the rafflecopter to win $10 worth of resources from my TpT store!  
2. The big prizes!  We are all pooling our resources to give away for secondary science teachers 5 $100 Teachers Pay Teachers gift cards!  Each blog post has a secret code work at number.  
My word is #14. who.  Collect the words from each blog shown below, write them down in numerical order and then submit the sentence into the big giveaway for a chance at a $100 gift card.   Note: This rafflecopter only needs to be completed once. It is the same on each blog. 

The giveaway opens Monday at Noon and ends Friday at Midnight. 

Good luck!  Please feel free to comment below, or email me with any questions, and share with your science teacher friends! 

Lastly, there is one more science giveaway that is separate, but just happens to go be going on at the same time.  You can enter THAT ONE here.  

So you really have 3 chances to win something!   Good luck!  

a Rafflecopter giveaway


a Rafflecopter giveaway












Jul 31, 2017

Back to School Sale


If you haven't heard, I don't want you to miss out! Here are the details: 

Who: Teachers Pay Teachers
What: Back to School Sale
Where:  My store 
When: August 1 and 2
How: Use the Promo Code BTS2017 
Why: So you can get all your back to school resources at a discount.  If I were you this is a great time to do one of a few things: 

Did you know??!  You can earn credit on TpT for leaving feedback!  Not everyone know that, but you can.  So any past paid purchases, make sure you leave feedback and you will get the credit to use toward your purchases during the sale, for an even better deal.  

If you aren't sure how to go about leaving feedback, check out this post

If you have any questions, please email me.  I want you to feel that all your questions are answered! 

Jul 29, 2017

5 Best Start-of-the-School-Year Experiments

Favorite STEM projects and science demonstrations, as well as discussion of what makes a good demonstration for science teachers.

Great Science Experiments and Demonstrations

One of the fun things about being a science teacher is being able to do hands-on activities and fun demonstrations.  These are the things kids remember when they get home, and remember years later. We've all been at some type of picnic or family function and heard someone talking about their crazy, wacky science teacher and the demonstration they did in class. Its multi-sensory, and different than other classes, and therefore more memorable! 

What are some of your favorites? 
What do you think makes a good demonstration or a good hands-on activity?

Requirements for a good demonstration

In my opinion, these are some things to consider to make a successful demonstration
  • It must use readily available materials. Materials that are too hard to get are unfamiliar to students and difficult for you to set up. It's also difficult to make up for students who might be absent 
  • Must work reliably! You don't want an activity that only works some of the time, or even most of the time, you need to be pretty sure that it's going to work.
  • It must clearly demonstrate the principle that you were trying to show. This should not be a leap for students to understand the science after they have done the initial activity or seen the demonstration. 
  • Sometimes I do an activity as a demonstration because I want to talk about it as we're working, it would be difficult for students to carry out correctly, or because I'm limited on space and materials for students to do it on their own or any variety of other reasons including safety. If it is feasible for students to carry out themselves, that is preferable.
Here is another source on what makes a good demonstration

Here's a secret for you

As a science teacher, demonstrations are fun, but I don't really like doing them! I get nervous! It's too much like a stage performance. I'd much rather have students run through stations or do activities. But some activities still lend themselves well to demonstrations. 

My Favorite Demonstrations 

(with accompanying videos; which can be a back up plan if you really don't like doing demonstrations)

STEM Projects

What about stem projects? What are some great stem projects to get your students thinking? Building and interacting? These can be great for the beginning or end of school or even for summer school, summer camps or those off days, such as those with assemblies. 

Stem projects and stem activities are such a broad category if you look them up you will find a wide variety of things. In my mind they break into at least two categories. Those that are chance for students to develop a hypothesis and test an experiment, and those that are a chance to build a product and work with a team to problem-solve and create something.  These may overlap, for example students may test something to make their product better.  However, students aren't really demonstrating the scientific process they're focused on working towards a goal.  This is more of an engineering project. 

  • One of my favorites is soda can cars. Students can even recreate this at home if they want to pretty easily.  
  • Another favorite is to see who's raft or boat can support the most pennies or paper clips.  

Image result for coin aluminium foil boat
From http://www.ramstein.af.mil/News/Photos/igphoto/2001055392/
  • There is a common experiment, which is very engaging with milk, food coloring, and dish soap.  Just be aware of the potential for a lot of cleanup, or any milk allergies. 
  • Static electricity activities can be easy, fun and engaging, such as bending water, and balloon races.  These are described in details here in my free static lab
  • A balloon car or a CD hovercraft are also a lot of fun, and can be a chance for students to experiment and improve their design.  
  • A solar oven can be a longer-term project where students can really experiment with the materials and the angle, or it can be done as a one time project. 
  • More ideas are available here and here.  

Some of these can be a chance for students to experiment and develop an experiment, hypothesis, and a procedure. Others can be a great chance to explore a new topic or new concept at the beginning of a unit.  They are also great as a quick station or engagement activity, as well as a jumping-off point to get further into the unit.  In my opinion, they should be something that can be carried out in a period or two, unless you really want to start a much longer project.  Otherwise you risk losing the flow of what you are trying to teach. 

Lastly, another way to go is longer-term projects such as factors that affect seed or plant growth, longer-term monitoring of weather, composting (conditions that cause garbage to break down) or even setting up ecocolumns.  

For more information on these type of projects, I would just looking into Problem based learning (more to come on that).  A couple great sources of information are available here and here.

I'd love to see pictures of your science activities!  Please share with me on facebook, instagram or by email
Favorite STEM projects and science demonstrations, as well as discussion of what makes a good demonstration for science teachers.

Jul 15, 2017

Free Training: How to Be In Two Places at Once


timesaving tips for teachers - get your grading and copying done while you are doing something else

A little summer professional development for you

We all like to learn something, especially if it's focused on making our lives easier and saving us some time during the school year.  I know we aren't thinking about school at the moment, but give it a chance....it's not so bad if you can sit in your living room, or on your deck, and learn some tips to make your life easier.

I want to focus on ways to limit your time at the copier, and also ways to save yourself time grading. This lets you be in two places at once because while your papers are being graded, you can be working with students, eating your lunch, or even at home enjoying your time with your family instead of grading. 

Limit your time at the copier, here are some easy tips

  • If you are copying something like a reading, news article, or even directions, make a class set or make a class at +10.  If you're a secondary teacher and have 100 or 150 students they don't all need a copy.  Chances are many of them will get left on the tables or thrown out.  You can always make some extra if students want to annotate them, or keep them, but you will still end up with much few copies. Fewer copies = less time standing at the copier!  They will get trained pretty quickly that you're going to re-collect the directions or the reading.  If anyone really wants to keep it or has marked it up a lot that's fine, but it will save a lot of paper and a lot copying time and frustration.
  • Secondly, try going digital! There are excellent resources on digital interactive notebooks.  Look into these, Google forms instead of quizzes, or start using Google Classroom.  All of these are amazing because you will no longer be spending your days standing in line at the copier, fighting with the stapler, or paper jams.  You simply make your assignments, assign it to your students and a copy is automatically made for each one of them it's a huge time saver!!!  Also, if they need a new copy, that can be done painlessly.  It's automatically saved so they won't lose theirs either! A few good resources for going digital are 
  • Thirdly think about how you can save some paper.  When you save paper you're also saving yourself time at the copier. For example can you copy something on a half sheet? I do bell work on a sheet for the whole week and make a box for each day. I have even done it for two weeks.  I collect the same paper every day for that time period. That means I'm only copying one bell work sheet once every two weeks or once every 4 weeks if I do them double-sided, rather than daily! 

Saving Time Grading


  • A lot of assignments can be graded simply on a check/check plus/check minus/zero basis. It's pretty easy to see whether the students did the assignment, they did it almost perfectly, they did a really poor job on it, or they didn't do it at all. You can give some quick feedback, but this saves you a lot of time checking every single word on their paper.  Over time, if you have a lot of grades like I do, it will become pretty obvious all of those checks and check pluses and check minuses will average out.  I enter them in my grade book as 100, 75, 50, and 0.
  • Let the computer grade automatically!  One of the best ways to do this is with a Google form quiz. You set up the quiz questions, and of course an answer key, ahead of time. It will automatically grade if they are objective questions. You can choose if students get immediate feedback or if their scores have to be 'released' by you.  

Bonus

  • Another option, depending on what type of devices that you have, is Socrative. This is easier for students to do phone or some other smaller devices that Google forms, and it also can give immediate feedback and automatic grading.
  • Lastly, I have never used Zipgrade, but I've heard amazing things about being able to grade objective questions on your phone.
What will you do with your free time, now that you are spending less of your planning period, lunch period, and after school time grading papers and standing at the copier?  


timesaving tips for teachers - get your grading and copying done while you are doing something else

Jul 2, 2017

Look Ahead: Less Stress and More Free Time Next Year


Image result for no tired like teacher tired

Give Yourself Less Stress and More Free Time Next Year

As you finish up this year you may be wondering what you can do to put yourself in a better position for next year, or to make things easier in September. I know you are tired now. It's true....there is no tired like teacher tired!

There are small amounts of energy that you can expend now, or even in the early part of the summer, that will make your life much easier in September! 

Exactly what those are depends on if you know what you will be teaching in the fall or not.  Here are some ideas to get you started. 

Easy steps to take to give yourself and easier September

If you know what you will be teaching you can really take a lot of pressure off those early fall days by making your photo copies for your first unit or your first week now! For example, the copier will be busy, probably jamming, running out of paper, and you'll be set with your copies already made! Finally, even if you don't know what you're teaching there may be some basics that you can photocopy such as a safety contract, a first day get to know you activity.  Even those will take pressure off in September. That leaves you free time to take care of all the other crazies that you know will be coming up in the fall.

If you don't know what you're teaching in the fall you can still save yourself time.  I am often in this position. In this case it is a matter of setting yourself up for success. For example, make sure all your materials are put away neatly, in an organized fashion.  Label them.  You think you will remember but 6 months from now you very well may not!  Decide if it will work better for you to put them away in kits, or if you want to put them away by type of material. Whatever you decide make sure they are organized. 

Another thing you can do is to do some cleaning now and maybe even set up basic materials. For example, I know that I have sets of materials that will be at each table.  I have a pencil box with a couple pairs of scissors, markers, tape, etc. I go through those at the end of the year, clean them up, throw out of markers that don't work, replenish the colors, etc.  When I pick them up again they are ready to go in the fall. 

If you have file cabinets or storage cupboards this is a good time to go through and get rid of things that you haven't used, or think you  may not use again.   Anything old, broken, really out of date, or just things that maybe where there when you moved in. This is your chance! Start off the year with a 'clean slate' so to speak, and ready for whatever may come!

Depending on your school and your department, you may be in charge of materials or chemical inventory, That's something you can do now!  You may be in charge of ordering new supplies, again that's something you can make a huge dent in right now.  Even if you don't place your final order, if you start compiling a list and getting prices, it will be easy to tweak and submit the order when the time comes.

On a different level, another thing you can do now to help yourself organize is simply to look back through your lesson plans and make some notes and reflections while this year is fresh in your mind. Its important during the summer to clear your mind, and really take a break. But at the same time you don't want to lose those ideas, memories, and reflections that you have now.  You know what things went well, and what you want to change for next year.  Are their units you want to reorganize?  Sequences you want to change?  A new strategy that you want to try? Or things that worked particularly well?  Activities or strategies that didn't work? Now is the time to make those notes and changes, or even to layout a skeleton of the sequence that you want to use next year.  I believe it's better to do that now while this year is fresh in your mind then give it some time to percolate over the summer. 

If you have big projects that you know you are planning, such as a science fair, or a committee or club that you're involved in such as National Honor Society, Science Olympiad, or any others, now is the time to get lay the groundwork for those. That's one thing off your plate when you find out what you are teaching.

Lastly, depending upon what your technology options are, look into using more tech. It really is easier on the teacher! It allows you to facilitate, rather than be on the stage, and again, less wasted time copying.  You may also spend less time grading if you use some automatically grading options (more info coming on those)

Please share with post with another teacher you know that could use less stress next year!! 

Easy steps to take to give yourself and easier September


Jun 18, 2017

5 Fun and Easy Ways to Gamify Your Review

5 Easy Ways to Engage and Assess Your Students 

As we are closing up the school year and looking for ways to review and keep students engaged games are a big one! You may be looking for ways to do your end review, or even to review for a unit, or simply end the week.  We are all tired, hot, and looking for some ways to make school more fun. 
 
I get it. Elementary school students are almost done with their year, they are silly, tired of state testing, and probably watching movies in some classes.  High school students are hot, tired, more interested in talking about prom and summer plans than classes.  But you still want to teach - you can! 

Great options to engage your students and assess their understanding~

Here are top 5 favorite ways to introduce technology engage students and make review more fun:

 
You can keep your students engaged and doing some serious review! 

Top 5 Engaging Review Strategies

  • Kahoot  - You set up a series of questions and answers ahead of time (or you can use shared templates created by other teachers). Students can play on their own or in teams, and on any device (chromebook, phone, tablet, etc).  Students get points for both speed and correct answers, so it gets very competitive!  Kahoot.com describes it as “It is a game based classroom response system played by the whole class in real time.” I have seen it used with elementary to high school ages students, all of whom were very engaged.
  • Quizlet Live - Quizlet Live is very similar, it is a real-time, team-based classroom game. In this case it is better based on vocabulary, formulas, or other things that can be matched (as opposed to multiple choice questions). It emphasizes accuracy over speed, but still gets competitive. 
  • Quizziz - Quizziz is also a multiplayer quiz game.  It can be done real-time, or assigned individually outside of class (or in class). It also emphasizes giving the teacher detailed data. Students play together on the same questions, but at their own pace. 
  • Plickers - This is a more short term option. Maybe you just want a few quick review questions, a ticket out the door, or even a formative assessment built into a lesson.  Plickers aren’t as much to gamify a series of questions, but to quickly and easily collect answers in a fun and novel way.  Plickers are described as “a powerfully simple tool that lets teachers collect real-time formative assessment data without the need for student devices.”  Students get pre-printed cards that they hold up.  You have an app on your phone that uses the camera to collect instant (almost) data on their answers. Pretty AMAZING! 
  • And a bonus (non-tech) option recommended to me by a friend - Bazinga!  This one I have not played before, but it sounds like a LOT of fun.  This came from a great discussion with Brooke in my Facebook Group. If you aren’t in it already, check it out here 
 

Why are these types of review important? 


We know how important it is for students to review, but they often don't see the connection between class, exams, and the need to review. It's obvious to us how important it is to review, but once they're done, they're checked out!  Many students are not focused on their review, or if they don't feel successful then they don't want to participate. 
 
These types of review give options for team or individual play and they all have an element beyond just getting the right answer.  This keeps students engaged especially near the end of the year when it's difficult to maintain focus (for both us and the students).  Students can review and feel like they are playing a game, rather than working!  And you get some serious review and get to raise your test scores, while your students are playing a game! 

If you have another review strategy that you love, please leave a comment below. I'd love to hear your favorites! If you try one of these, please comment below or email me and let me know how it goes! 

Great options to engage your students and assess their understanding

May 26, 2017

3 Fail-Proof Strategies for Students with Low Literacy Skills

3 Fail-Proof Strategies for Students with Low Literacy Skills

A few years ago our evaluation scores were based on test scores, and we had to predict early in the year how students would do on those tests, and set goals, with our administrators.

This led to a lot of looking at data in order to set realistic, but reasonable goals for students. Because I am science teacher, there weren’t as many benchmarks as there are for reading or math. There is a lack of previous scores, and earlier science classes aren’t always indicative of how the students will perform in later classes. After looking at a lot of data, I found that the best predictor for my students’ science test scores was actually their reading level.

This is so frustrating for us as teachers because the content we teach them is only part of the picture. It is also frustrating for students because they can’t really demonstrate what they know. As teachers we do have obligation to help fill some of these literacy gaps, but we also want to teach content, and not have the content get lost in the reading difficulties.

A description of strategies that content teachers can use when faced with struggling readers

Where I teach there are so many students in my classroom who struggle with low literacy skills, and this is problematic for them in school, particularly in the upper grades where reading is no longer taught. Students who have lower literacy skills struggle and become disengaged with school, but as content teachers, or teachers of higher grades, we are not always equipped to teach reading skills. So what do we do? How do we help them in class?
  • Find other ways to get them the information
  • Find other ways for them to express their knowledge
  • Use scaffolding tools such as text to speech, word walls, integrated instruction of vocabulary and more to allow them to build on their strengths, instead of focusing on weaknesses. 

Find other ways to help them get the content

Especially now, not all content has to be taught through reading and writing. We can, of course, lecture, but this may not hold students’ attention. Whether you want students to work independently, or in stations, another great way for students to learn new content is through videos, often with some type of guided notes, graphic organizer, or reflection tool.

Some of my favorite science YouTube channels are:
Comment below with your favorite source for science videos

Let them demonstrate their knowledge in other ways

The options here are countless. You can still require students to use key vocabulary terms, but some students may struggle with the organizational/spelling/writing aspects. Instead, they could show their knowledge in other ways. Here are just a few options. If you have other ideas, please feel free to comment below, I’d love to hear!
  • Draw (create a comic strip to show a process, or a poster) 
  • Create a PowerPoint (or Google Slide presentation)
  • Record a podcast or video (easy with iPads or Chrome extensions like Screencastify)
  • Create a brochure
  • Create a commercial or skit
  • Create a concept map (discussed here)
  • Use graphic organizers or foldable organizers

Scaffold their reading skills

Some students cannot read content very well because they struggle with the vocabulary (either content vocabulary or tier 2 vocabulary). I have already written quite a bit about how I tackle vocabulary in my classroom in this post, here, and here and even for homework.

In addition to vocabulary other reading skills can be taught. Students can practice making their own test questions, with answers to get used to the structure and language of test questions. They can also be taught to read and understand diagrams better. Particularly in science class there are often questions that involve diagrams. Even students who struggle with reading long passages of text can often understand a diagram and answer questions correctly.

Next time you are working with a student whose reading levels are way below grade level don’t give up! And don’t let the student give up! Remember your goals: teaching content, assisting with reading, and teaching strategies. Both you and the student might be very surprised at how much he or she really understands when given the chance to express himself in other ways. When a student is more successful and confident in your class, they are more likely to continue to try harder and achieve greater success as well.

If you try out any of these strategies, I’d love to hear how they go. Please leave a comment below, or send me an email If you would like to see any of the resources that I use with my classes, please feel free to check out my Teachers Pay Teachers Literacy Items.

A description of strategies that content teachers can use when faced with struggling readers


May 11, 2017

Tips for a Successful Year End Review

Tips for a Successful End of the Year Review

Reviewing for regents exams, or other state exams can be overwhelming. There is so much content: labs, diagrams, vocabulary, and just facts to know. Students want to do well, but they are tired, and they often don’t know how to study on their own. They don’t want to listen to you lecture, and you don’t want to lecture, but they need direction.

Tips to use for end of year review, especially in high school biology class (Regents)

When reviewing for state exams, in particular, it is critical to look back at past state tests and to see what has often been asked. For New York State those exams are available here. However, students quickly get bored and frustrated with simply doing past questions. This doesn’t give them a study tool, it often just shows them what they already know, or what they don’t know. Many students are not able to take this to the next level and use it as a study tool.

We as teachers want to help them succeed, and want to feel like we have done everything we can, but many teachers struggle with ‘what to do for review?’ or ‘how to structure the review to cover the right content?’

Tweet: However, students quickly get bored and frustrated with simply doing past questions. This doesn’t give them a study tool, it often just shows them what they already know, or what they don’t know.

This is How I Structure My Year End Review

Homework

For my year end review I like to assign something fairly open-ended, with choice for homework. This is something that students can make progress on their own, and won’t be studying ‘wrong’ but will be learning some study skills. One choice would be this free Review Assignment (applicable to any subject). This also eliminates the problem of cheating on practice test questions assigned at home.


Break it up

This is also a good time to utilize games and puzzles to break up review after students get bored of lecture and/or practice questions. A very popular way to do this is the use of Tarsia Puzzles (also called Magic Squares).

The ‘Meat’ of the Review

The bulk of my review, however comes from this resource, which I have created. It is organized by main topics within the New State Living Environment Course (Biology). Each topic has one or two pages. It is in guided notes format, with key diagrams that need to be labelled, or bullet points that need to be filled in. It can be used in several ways.


Depending upon the group of students that I have that year, I may use this resource in several ways:
  • Hand out the entire packet at once, or I may hand it out one topic at a time, or only use some sections and review other sections in other ways.
  • I will often put students in partners (or on their own) to complete a short section, then regroup and go over it.
  • I have also had them complete a short section, check with a partner, and then check their answers against the key.
  • A teacher answer key is included, so it is a very easy option if you want to copy the answer key for students (or a portion of it).
  • I have also had students lead, up at the board, going over the answers with the answer key.

It is open-ended enough that it keeps students actively thinking and engaged, but complete enough that it gives them a great study resource when they are finished.

This includes sections for the New York State Required Labs (Beaks of Finches: Evolution, Relationships and Biodiversity: Evidence for Evolutionary Relationships, Making Connections: Experimental Design and Homeostasis, Diffusion through a Membrane) as well as the following units of study:
  • scientific inquiry
  • classification of living things
  • microscope, cells 
  • macromolecules
  • enzymes
  • cell membrane
  • photosynthesis and respiration
  • nucleic acids
  • mitosis and meiosis
  • genes and heredity
  • modern genetics
  • evolution
  • human body systems
  • reproduction
  • homeostasis
  • ecology
  • and human impact on the environment. 
The main points that are reviewed in each section are based on questions and topics that are most commonly asked on state testing.

What Else do I do In Class to Prepare them for the Test?

I usually review a topic or two using one of the above discussed methods and then do some practice past state test questions that draw specifically on that topic. This allows them to see the relevance and value of the review, and to have more success with the questions by being active participants in the review.

I know the end of the year can be chaotic, but end of the year testing is still important to both you and the students and we all want them to do their best. This can even ben a time to try some changes to routines in preparation for next year, and to keep things fresh at the end of this year.

I find this review structure (with some use of games or stations periodically to break it up depending upon your group and your time schedule) to be successful because students know what to expect, and they can see the purpose behind it. It is important that students buy-in to the review strategy, and understand what that the plan is, and the reasoning behind what you are asking them to do. Sometimes I even kick-off review with a contract that I have the students create and sign regarding which actions they plan to take to ensure that they do well (study each night, stay after school for extra help, participate in review, etc). This makes it clear where they are going. They can feel success as they complete it, and they also have a study resource when they are finished. Instead of being bored, students actually look forward to the structure, knowing what’s coming next, and seeing some progress in their learning and their scores.

I hope you will head over here, check out the previews, and try it out for yourself if you teach Biology. Please let me know what you think!!

Tips to a successful year end review in Regents Living Environment or other Biology Courses

May 1, 2017

Tips for Successful Technology Sub Plans

Tips for Successful Sub Plans
We’ve all been there – you have to be out for a day, but its nerve-wracking. What to leave for a sub?  How to make sure it goes smoothly?  You don’t want to waste a day of class, and you don’t want to come back to chaos the next day.
Here are my suggestions (granted I have mostly taught secondary, but I think these suggestions would work even with upper elementary as well).
  1. LEAVE THE DIRECTIONS DIRECTLY FOR YOUR STUDENTS
  2. LEAVE THE SUB PREPARED
  3. HAVE A BACK UP PLAN
Read more here on our collaborative blog 

Apr 19, 2017

The Biggest Lessons Learned from TPT Flock 2017

Lessons Learned at TPT Flock 17

Recently (April 8th) I had the opportunity to attend the Northeast Regional TpT Flock Meet Up/Conference. What an amazing experience! It has been a really busy time of year, and I was very tired going into the event. I was questioning if I should go but I learned so much. It's hard to narrow down my biggest takeaway and defining moments as a TpT seller and as a teacher. Here are three of my biggest lessons learned.


A reflection on my biggest takeaways from TPT Flock Conference 2017, and how much value we each have as educators.

We are Part of Something Amazing!

The keynote speaker, Art with Jenny K did an activity where we each received a square with a part of a design and selected colors to use to color it in. When we were done, while we are sessions to the pieces were assembled to see this amazing piece of artwork shown below!

I can’t say enough good things about the amazing way this art project came together! On this piece of art are some the key players from the main TpT headquarters. Here I was, standing and talking with people whose faces and reputations are known to me only through the website. I met some big names on TpT, as well as some of the directors and administration at TpT headquarters. Everyone I met was so friendly and helpful, and excited to be there. There was not a sense of competition, but of helping each other rise up, and growing as a whole. There is a vision of sharing teachers’ knowledge and experience for the improvement of all.


Collaborative artwork with Jenny K at TPT Flock Conference; A symbol of our connected value


We are an Agent of Change in Education

We, as educators, are part of something so much bigger than ourselves, and have the chance to really be a force of change in education and make a difference in the lives of teachers and students. When I was completing my masters in education, the university that I attended put a big emphasis on being leaders in education in our community and being ‘agents of change.’ I have felt as if I wasn’t fulfilling that ideal because I did not go on to become an administrator, or maintain certain other leadership roles in the district. Part of the reason is because I have two small children, and because I am in a district that has a lot of change and transition. In my teaching career (11 years) I have been in 4 different schools in the district. Having a chance to speak with so many dynamic educators from across the country brought me to the realization that we are impacting education. As I post here on my website, or make resources to share with other teachers, and they are able to use my resources, or the lessons that I have learned and the things I value in education in their classrooms, there is an impact on many students, in many diverse areas. This is huge!

Also, as teachers, we are helping other teachers solve problems in their classrooms, and better assist their students.

We are not only sharing ideas and resources, but we are solving problems for our colleagues.
Tweet: We are not only sharing ideas and resources, but we are solving problems for our colleagues.

Still so Much to Learn

One of the most exciting things about the TpT is all the new learning. I am constantly learning about new technologies, ways to improve my writing, new groups and new ways to connect and more.

I had such a great time interacting with this dynamic group of educators from so many different states and even different countries. To hear their inspiring stories, learn from them, and know how much I can still learn.

I attended great workshops on using Pinterest, improving my website, using technology in the classroom, and idea brainstorming. So many great ideas! My brain is spinning, in a great way!

All of us at TPT Flock 2017 are so glad to be here, and to share our teaching ideas with you, as well as learn from you.

Maybe next year you will be standing here with us! And hopefully I won’t be so tired next year! Please check out TpTFlock to see some of the fantastic presentations and donors! Don’t be afraid to speak out as a voice for your students and offer your knowledge to other educators. We all have a lot of value to share, and by helping each other, we help greater numbers of students as well.


Let's Rock the Flock 2017 - Group Photo

Apr 5, 2017

3 Simple Strategies For Improving Comprehension

Three easy strategies to implement when your students struggle with tier 2 vocabulary and reading comprehension
Background Image Attribution “seventy; words” flickr photo by RCabanilla https://flickr.com/photos/47662183@N04/4564071101 shared under a Creative Commons (BY) license

Welcome! I am a secondary science teacher in an urban district in upstate NY. I am taught Earth Science, Biology, Environmental Science, AP Environmental Science, as well as middle school integrated science. I am excited to share some strategies with you to help your students be more successful. You can see more of my teaching ideas and resources at my website.

Many times I teach students content, and I do believe that they know the content. However, when given test questions, they cannot demonstrate their knowledge. So frustrating! I have tried a lot of different strategies to be help them be more successful with mixed results.

To read the rest of this post, click over to Performing in Education. This was a special guest post but I wanted to make sure to share it with you.

Mar 25, 2017

Excellent Collection of Science Teacher Free Resources


A collection of free science resources for you

I Know You Need Free Resources

When I look out the window all I see is SNOW! Day after day.  We have had a couple of snow days recently, and no break in sight.  This is the time when the school year really drags. Your plans get thrown off.  Sick kids (or sickness yourself), long dark days, and it all starts to seem like too much.  There are days you just want someone else to come up with a plan for you, or give you something that you can use when your plans won't work.

Myself and several other TpT sellers have collaborated to collect a variety of free Science TpT resources to help you and you students!   There is a great combination of hands-on activities, literacy activities, and even homework and review!

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